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Tuesday, February 14, 2012

Seniors Face Medicare Meltdown, Again

Joint statement issued today by C. Bruce Malone, president of the Texas Medical Association (TMA) and Olivia "Ollie" Besteiro, president of AARP Texas:

"The health of more than 3 million Texas seniors is in jeopardy, again. If Congress doesn’t take action, Medicare patients could lose access to the doctors they know and trust.

"On March 1, doctors face an unprecedented cut to their Medicare payments. The 27-percent cut could force even more physicians out of the program. This is not the first time doctors and Medicare patients have faced this crisis. It’s a 10-year-old issue. The formula Medicare uses to pay doctors is broken. It calculates a pay cut almost every year for doctors – jeopardizing health care for millions of seniors."

Take Action Today. Contact Congress.

"Every time Congress delays fixing the broken formula, the cost to taxpayers grows. In 2005, it would have cost $48 billion to throw out the formula. Today, it is nearly $300 billion. If Congress continues to use the same temporary patches it has in the past, the cost will double again in only five years.

"Texas physicians and Texas AARP are urging Congress to stop the irresponsible cycle of scheduled cuts and short-term patches to the Medicare payment system for doctors. It’s unacceptable that seniors could lose the doctors who have taken care of them for years just because Congress can’t find a solution.

"Republicans and Democrats in Congress need to work together to pass a long-term solution to this crisis so doctors can continue to provide Medicare patients with the health care they have earned and deserve."

C. Bruce Malone, MD
President, Texas Medical Association

Ollie Besteiro
President, Texas AARP

TEXAS PATIENTS: Call Congress. Stop the Medicare Meltdown.

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1 comment :

  1. I am already feeling the effects of this and I don't turn 65 for another month. But I need a new internist and the ones I want are closed to Medicare now. I am told by their staff that even if I start with them while still on private insurance, they will not continue to treat me as a patient once I go under Medicare. This stinks!

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